Pupil/Catch-up Premium

Pupil Premium Strategy

Pupil Premium is additional funding provided by the Government to enhance the education of the most socio-economically deprived.

The amount of Pupil Premium allocation that Hillcrest School and Sixth Form Centre receives can be seen below.

2012-13 £211,410
2013-14 £275,568
2014-15 £257,125
2015-16 £237,331
2016-17 £250,000 (Estimate)

Pupil Premium Strategy

Our Pupil Premium Strategy ensures that funding is spent to enable entitled students to receive additional support and resources to remove any barriers to learning. This happens across all key stages where we have extra staff hours to allow smaller groups, small group and one to one tuition and teaching assistant support. Funding is also being used to finance our Transition Summer School, Out of Hours Learning Support Classes, behaviour and pastoral support programmes, revision programmes and materials, special projects and additional resources. For example, the Accelerated Reading Programme, music tuition, Gifted and Talented programmes (The Brilliant Club), Home Learning Programmes and Special Educational Needs resources. The impact on educational achievement arising Pupil Premium expenditure are the outcomes for these students, as demonstrated in achievement, attendance and reward data.

Pupil Premium information Year 7 to 11 (2015-16):

60% of students in Year 7 to 11 were eligible for pupil premium funding.

One of the main barriers to learning identified by students and staff is the successful completion of homework to prepare students for the next stages of their learning. To support students with this the school introduced ‘Show My Homework’ in June 2016 to give students and parents access to homework tasks and resources online and via their smart phones. The homework facilities in school are available 8am each morning, at lunchtime and after school to allow students access to IT facilities and teacher support.

For more information please visit the Department for Education Website.

2014-15

Spending

2015-16

Spending

2016-17

Allocations

1.      Pupil Support – Teaching Additional Maths, English and Science groups, in class support, intervention groups, intervention/literacy coordinator and training. £125,151

 

 

£136,490 £136,583

 

2.      Pupil Support – Curriculum Enrichment and IT Curriculum based trips and learning off site, The Brilliant Club, Out of Hours Learning, The Accelerated Reader Programme, Library resources KS3/KS4 books, IT Dynamic Learning, Online Mathematics Programmes, SAM learning, Literacy Guides, Literacy boxes, Aim Higher activities, Mathematics new curriculum learning materials and homework support books. £104,307

 

 

£70,210

 

£84,117
3.      Pupil Support – Music Tuition Individual and small group instrumental tuition. £6000 £10,800 £10,000
4.      Study Support Holiday revision classes, Maths Boosters. £444 £1000 £2000
5.      Year 7 and 8 Progress Teacher Catch –up classes for students entering school below Level 4 in Year 7. £6721 £1537 £5000
6.      Pupil Support – Individual Resources Revision Guides, Technology CA resources, art resources and calculators. £2802 £4995 £5000
7.      Pupil Support –  Pastoral and external agencies Additional Education Welfare and IAG support. £11,700 £12,300 £12,300
  TOTAL £257,125 £237,331 £250,000

 

Year 11 2016-17 – 44% of students eligible for pupil premium funding

Year 11 2015-16 – 66% of students eligible for pupil premium funding

Year 11 2014-15 – 60% of students eligible for pupil premium funding

Year 11 2013-14 – 62% of students eligible for pupil premium funding

 

Narrowing The Gap 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

 

Year 11
GCSE Attainment
Students in receipt of Pupil Premium Funding Other
students
Students in receipt of Pupil Premium Funding Other
Students
Students in receipt of Pupil Premium Funding

(Hillcrest)

Other
Students(Hillcrest)
All  students

nationally

Other Students Nationally (NPP)
Attainment 8 Score 47.86 54.86 49.3 52.56
% A*-C Grades in English and Mathematics 40 92 62 69
% 5 or more A*-C Grades including English and Mathematics 35 55 36 50
% 5 or more A*-C Grades 40 62 58 69
% achieving  English Baccalaureate 18 31 31 43 36 61 25
% entered for the English Baccalaureate 53 74 39 52 58 92 40
Year 11

GCSE Progress

Students in receipt of Pupil Premium Funding Other
students
Students in receipt of Pupil Premium Funding Other
Students
Students in receipt of Pupil Premium Funding

(Hillcrest)

Other
Students(Hillcrest)
All  students

nationally

Other Students Nationally (NPP)
Progress 8 Score -0.05 +0.27 0.00 +0.10
% achieving expected progress in English 53 61 72 73  81  89
% achieving  more than expected progress in English 14 17 22 38  34  57
% achieving expected progress in Mathematics 46 74 52 65  48  82
% achieving more than expected progress in Mathematics 12 27 24 25  23  42

 

 

 

 

Summary of impact on GCSE outcomes 2016:

  • The expected progress of students in receipt of pupil premium funding is improving. Up 11% in English.
  • The % of students in receipt of pupil premium funding making more than expected progress in English is improving. Up 15%.
  • The % of students in receipt of pupil premium funding making more than expected progress in mathematics is improving. Up 3%.
  • The % of students in receipt of pupil premium funding achieving A*-C in mathematics and English is improving. Up 8%.
  • The % of students in receipt of pupil premium funding achieving English Baccalaureate is improving and is above the performance of other students nationally.
  • The % of students in receipt of pupil premium funding achieving 5 A*-C grades including English and Maths is improving. Up 6%.
  • Summary of impact on Year 7 to 10 in 2016:
  • Year 10 students external GCSE Science results show that students in receipt of pupil premium funding achieved 10% above other students in terms of A*-C grades.
  • The gap between students in receipt of pupil premium funding is closing, for example in Year 9 students in receipt of pupil premium funding achieved almost a third of a grade lower than other students in the autumn term. By the end of the summer term students in receipt of pupil premium funding achieved almost a fifth of a grade higher on average.

 

Priorities for 2016-2017:

  • Raise attainment and progress for all students in mathematics, especially those in receipt of pupil premium funding.
  • Close the gap between students in receipt of pupil premium funding and others in the attainment of A*-C in English and mathematics.

 

Catch-up Premium Strategy
The literacy and numeracy catch-up premium gives schools additional funding to support year 7 pupils who did not achieve at least level 4 in reading and/or maths at the end of Key Stage 2.
Allocations
2012-2013                            £8,500
2013- 2014                           £7,500
2014-15                                £4,500
2015-2016                            £10,000
2016-2017                            TBC
 

 

Money is currently spent on a tuition programme for students who do not achieve level 4 in English and/or Maths.  The students each have an initial meeting with the one to one tutor (primary trained) to assess their individual needs and do a baseline assessment.  A timetable is then devised that meets the needs of the students which ranges from intense one to one work, pair work or small group work.  Students’ progress is monitored after each data entry and by the assessments done with the tutor.  If students have made sufficient progress (secure level 4) they may exit the tuition programme, but are still monitored throughout their time in year 7 and may come back into the scheme if their working at levels remain unchanged or decrease. Last year’s Year 7 catch-up premium money was spent in the same way and yielded the results below.
Impact of Year 7 Catch-up Premium
English Impact 2015/2016
One-to-one catch-up tutoring was provided to all students who had key stage 2 points of below 25.
Overall success:
·         74% reached a score of 25 by the end of Year 7.
There were four students who did not reach 25 points. However, their targets were lower than 25 due to their lower starting points at primary school. Three of the four students however met their progress target for the year.
Mathematics Impact 2015/2016
One-to-one catch-up tutoring was provided to all students who had Key Stage 2 points of below 25.
Overall success:
·         63% reached a score of 25 by the end of the Year 7.
There were six students who did not reach 25 points. However, their targets were lower than 25 points due to their lower starting points at primary school. One of the six students did met their progress target for the year.

 

Updated Sept 2016