English Language and Literature

At Hillcrest we have very high expectations of our students. Great emphasis is placed on hard work, achievement and high standards of behaviour.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE

KEY STAGE 3 CURRICULUM

 

All students follow a topic-based curriculum with engaging topics relevant to students’ interests and the world around them. The curriculum is designed to develop the skills in the new KS3 curriculum and to support students in developing an understanding of themselves as part of a global society.

We aim to develop strong language skills, the ability to work independently and to communicate effectively in a group and of course a love of language learning combined with a positive attitude towards speakers of other languages. Our curriculum supports the transition from Key Stage 2 and increasingly develops the examination skills required for the GCSE examination.  We also encourage and support speakers of other languages to value those skills and where possible to take early entry GCSEs in their home languages.

We promote high standards by ensuring that students have a strong understanding of grammar and structure to enable them to understand and communicate successfully and independently. There is a strong emphasis on using the foreign language as a means of communication within the classroom and developing the skills necessary for effective communication.

We strongly believe that learning a foreign language also support students’ literacy skills in English, through the development of their understanding of sentence structure, grammar, vocabulary and communication skills and ensure that students are able to transfer these skills to other subjects.

In addition, fortnightly lessons in IT rooms using Active-Learn enable students to develop their listening and reading skills independently, both in school and at home. Students are assessed regularly throughout the year through a mixture of teacher assessments, classroom-based activities and formal assessments in speaking, listening, reading and writing. These assessments increasingly mimic the GCSE style of assessment so that they are fully prepared for GCSE requirements.

Year 7
Term 11a: ‘Send My Friend’ – Students explore a wider range of non-fiction texts, focusing on securing the grammar, punctuation and spelling skills students have encountered at Key Stage 2, whilst producing formal writing of their own. 1b: ‘Hillcrest Poetry Anthology’ – Students study a wide range of poetry from across the literary landscape, including the specific study of poems from other cultures. Students are then assessed on their ability to analyse a poem from the anthology under examination conditions based upon what they have learned.
Term 22a: ‘Fiction Reading: Short Stories’ – Students analyse a series of short stories in detail, helping them consolidate and develop their comprehensions skills from KS2. Assessment is via a set of comprehension questions based on an extract read in class. 2b: ‘Narrative Writing’ – Students engage critically with a range of different styles of narrative writing exploring the plot structures and key language features of this style of writing before they then learn to create their own piece of narrative writing under examination conditions.
Term 33a: ‘19th and 21st Century Non-Fiction Reading: Health’ – Students engage with a range of different styles of non-fiction writing from both centuries, with the focus theme being health. They will learn how to analyse the key structural and language features of various texts before they then learn to how to analyse and compare two texts in timed conditions. 3b: ‘Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’/Sonnets’ – Building on KS2 study, students are exposed to a Shakespearean play as well so some of his sonnets. Students are then assessed on their ability to be creative and will write their own sonnet in the style of Shakespeare.

Year 8
Term 11a: ‘Shakespeare – `Macbeth’ – Students engage critically with Shakespeare’s infamous tradegy in full. They gain insight into Shakespeare’s craft and conventions and are assessed by a two-part examination: a close-reading of an extract, then an extended response to the whole play. 1b: ‘Superheroes and Supervillains: Reading Non-Fiction’ – Building on what they have learned in year 7, students engage with a range of non-fiction texts from the 19th and 21st centuries, with the focus theme being heroes and villains. They will learn how to analyse the language in the texts, and how to form evaluations before they then learn to how to compare two texts in timed conditions.
Term 22a: ‘Seminal world literature’ – Students explore a novel specifically focusing on how literature emerges from different global cultures and traditions. This informs their increasingly critical analysis of the novel and their critical vocabulary. Assessment focuses on essay-writing skills. 2b: ‘Persuasive and Argumentative Writing’ – Students engage critically with a range of different styles of transactional writing exploring the key structural and language features of articles, informal letters, reports, speeches, reviews and leaflets before they then learn to create their own piece of transactional writing, and deliver a persuasive presentation.
Term 33a: ‘Romantic Poetry Anthology – Students engage critically with a range of poems from the Romantic era. Students will learn what influenced the Romantics and how to engage critically with a romantic poems. Assessment is in the form of a comparison of two romantic poems. 3b: ‘Dickensian Characters’ – students will be exposed to a range of extracts from Dickens’s famous novels ‘Oliver Twist’, ‘David Copperfield’ and ‘Great Expectations’ to critically engage with how character is created. They will then use these extracts as a stimulus to create their own description of a character and setting.

Key Stage 4 Curriculum (English Language) 

EDUQUAS GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE                                                                   

CORE SUBJECT

COURSE CONTACT: MRS R DRURY – LEARNING MANAGER

Exam Board Website: http://www.eduqas.co.uk/qualifications/english-language/gcse/ 

Course Content

All students study this core subject, which leads to a GCSE qualification graded 9 (highest) to 1 (lowest); students’ certificates will also be endorsed with a three-tiered grade (Pass, Merit, and Distinction) to reflect their ability to speak formally in spoken language.

Component 1 – 20th Century Literature Reading and Creative Prose Writing

Section A (20%) – Reading: Understanding of one extract (about 60-100 lines) of literature from the C20th. Structured questions.

Section B (20%) – Prose Writing. One creative writing task selected from a choice of four titles.

Component 2 – 19th and 21st Century Non-fiction Reading and Transactional/Persuasive Writing

Section A (30%) – Reading: Understanding of two extracts (about 900-1200 words) of high-quality

non-fiction writing, one from C19th and one from C21st. Structured questions.

Section B (30%) – Writing: Two compulsory transactional/persuasive writing tasks.

Component 3 – Spoken Language: A formal speech, including responses to questions and feedback.

Assessment Details

Linear: all examinations take place at the end of the Year 11 course. The qualification is graded 9-1. Spoken Language is a compulsory component but does not contribute to the overall grade. Sentence structure, punctuation, spelling, and vocabulary carry a heavy weighting (20% of qualification).

Examinations

Paper 1 (Assesses Component 1): 1 hour, 45 minutes (40% of total qualification)

Paper 2 (Assesses Component 2): 2 hours (60 % of total qualification)

Non-examination Assessment: Spoken language (unweighted but separately endorsed as P, M or D)

Why Study This Course?

The study of English Language is essential for the future career prospects of all students. The government’s recent emphasis on academic rigour and the importance of the traditional subjects means this is more important than ever for students.

Language interrogation encourages enquiring minds to supports study across the curriculum.

A hugely diverse range of careers follows the study of English, including writing, journalism, teaching, and research.

High profile graduates include; Oprah Winfrey (Broadcaster, Writer & CEO), JK Rowling (Author), Judy Finnegan (Presenter, Author & national Book Club director), Vanessa Feltz (Broadcaster and Journalist), Stephen Spielberg (Film Director) and Vin Diesel (Actor) to name but a few!

 

Key Stage 4 Curriculum (English Literature)

EDUQUAS GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE                                                                  

CORE SUBJECT

COURSE CONTACT: MRS R DRURY – LEARNING MANAGER

Exam Board Website: http://eduqas.co.uk/qualifications/english-literature/gcse/

Course Content

Course Content

Almost all students study this academic subject, which leads to a GCSE qualification graded 9 (highest) to 1. A small number of students following Pathway 3 focus on achievement in English Language only.

Component 1 – Shakespeare and Poetry

Section A – Shakespeare (20%): one extract and one essay question based on the reading of a whole Shakespeare play.

Section B – Poetry from 1789-present day (20%): two questions (poems from an anthology, one of which involves comparison.

Component 2 – Post-1914 Prose/Drama, C19th Prose and Unseen Poetry

Section A – Post-1914 prose/drama (20%): One, source-based question on a whole post-1914 Prose or Drama text studied.

Section B – C19th Prose (20%): One, source-based question on a whole C19th text studied.

Section C – Unseen poetry from the C20th/21st (20%): Two questions on unseen poems, one of which involved comparison.

 

Assessment Details

Assessment Details

Assessment is by end of course, linear examinations. There is no non-examination assessment and all examinations are closed-book. Marks are included for accurate spelling, punctuation, and grammar (5% of qualification).

Examinations

Examinations

Paper 1: Component 1 – 2 hours (40% of qualification)

Paper 2: Component 2 – 2 hours, 30 minutes (60% of qualification)

Why Study This Course?

Why Study This Course?

The study of English Language is essential for the future career prospects of all students. The government’s recent emphasis on academic rigour and the importance of the traditional subjects means this is more important than ever for students.

Language interrogation encourages enquiring minds to supports study across the curriculum.

A hugely diverse range of careers follows the study of English, including writing, journalism, teaching, and research.

High profile graduates include; Oprah Winfrey (Broadcaster, Writer & CEO), JK Rowling (Author), Judy Finnegan (Presenter, Author & national Book Club director), Vanessa Feltz (Broadcaster and Journalist), Stephen Spielberg (Film Director) and Vin Diesel (Actor) to name but a few!